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A few more resources

26 Mar

We’re right in the middle of our last round of speeches, and it’s the time in the term when extra endurance is necessary. Here are some links to mull over as you prepare your speech, or (if you’ve already given your last speech) tips to help you prepare to evaluate your colleagues’ speeches:

EDIT:

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Resources for week of March 12-16

13 Mar
  • Index of Famous Women Speeches — a long list of speeches given by women which includes “First Ladies, governors, members of Congress, a prime minister, business executives, religious crusaders, cancer and stroke survivors, government agency heads, activists, writers, actresses, singers, royalty, women who are old, young, black, white, Native American, Muslim, Jewish, Christian, liberal,  and conservative” — the site also includes critiques/analysis of these speeches.

Speak with Authority

5 Mar

Taylor Mali reading his poem “Totally Like Whatever“:

Resources for the week of February 27-March 2

27 Feb

As we start round 3 of speeches, here are some links to consider:

  • 10 Ways to Wow your Audience by Susan Krauss Whitbourne — “Here are the guidelines that great speakers follow that rely on simple application of these principles derived from social, educational, and applied psychology.”

and for those of you who are preparing your PowerPoint presentations for your design project:

90 seconds of advice

9 Feb

Links to check out:

25 Jan
  • More on storytelling: here’s a YouTube video with Ira Glass, host of the NPR show This American Life, discussing the ‘building blocks’ of what it takes to tell a good story.
  • Even TED speakers are anxious before their presentation — a reflective post featuring several TED speakers’ thoughts on their nervousness before a speech

Speech as Case Study: Martin Luther King, Jr.

16 Jan

Today is Martin Luther King Jr. day in the States, which is a federal holiday commemorating the work of this important civil rights leader.  In honor of today, here’s his most famous speech, “I Have A Dream”:

Why is this speech so memorable? Here are a few links that provide some analysis:

and here is one of my favorite communication gurus, Nancy Duarte, examining why this speech was so rhetorically effective:

Keep in mind that a big part of RCM 401 is being able to provide insightful commentary on your colleagues’ presentations.  Analyses like these may give you some tips in what to look for as you evaluate speeches this term.

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